Spring in North Germany: the white stork

Spring has come early this year and the first storks were seen at the end of February already. We took a trip through the country side yesterday and were lucky to find one standing on it’s nest in one of the villages around.

White storks are very much loved in (North-)Germany. It  is a sign of good luck and fertility when a stork decides to build a nest on the gables. Many farmers build a  with a high pole with a small platform on top to make it possible for a stork to breed.

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The legend says that it is the stork bringing the babies, and when I was very small  I was told by my grandparents to  put sugar on the window-sill. The stork would find it and reward me with a baby brother or sister. Also, when  someone gets married in the countryside, people often place a plastic stork on their roof to wish the young couple good luck with having children.

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2 thoughts on “Spring in North Germany: the white stork

  1. I miss the storks here in Ireland. They are a sign of summer back in Lithuania. When you spot one in spring, you can’t help but feel hopeful that ‘this is it, summer’s definitely round the corner’. They are the ones who bring babies, too. Only I never heard about leaving sugar for them…

    • Maybe the thing with the sugar was my grandparents idea, but I remember telling a young aunt that this is what she should do if she wanted a baby. So at least for a little while I believed what I was told, but then in the very early sixties we still grew up without TV and were much more naive than today’s kids.

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